This year’s Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas featured all sorts of cool devices including plenty of virtual reality technologies. All-in-all, 800 exhibitors from across the world put their electronics on display. VR creations with a particular focus on fitness made quite the lasting impact on show-goers.

HTC Vive’s VR Fitness

The HTC Vive virtual reality technology was on full display at the Wynn’s Alsace Ballroom during the CES festivities. The company’s Knockout League game looks like it will be a raging success. Knockout League is a virtual reality boxing game that forces one to dodge punches and attack opponents with jabs, hooks, uppercuts and so on.

 

Vive also displayed its vSports platform created in tandem with VirZOOM. This platform is best described the ultimate combination of virtual reality and fitness. VirZOOM allows players to exercise in a variety of virtual locations modeled after real-world sites. The competition aspect comes in the form of player rankings on Internet leaderboards as well as player leagues and tournaments.

Icaros Active Virtual Reality

Icaros is creating a legitimate virtual reality gym. Its Active VR provides a comprehensive workout. Exercise-seekers partake in Active VR by assuming a plank position on the ground. They swivel in different directions to control movement within the games. Built with a gyroscopic design, this full-body system works the core muscles as players fly through all sorts of unique virtual environments. Those who have grown bored with traditional workouts will likely fall in love with Active VR. This virtual exercise machine makes physical activity quite enjoyable. The learning curve is short yet difficulty can be ramped up as the player progresses through stages. Active VR functions with the Samsung Gear VR headset as well as HTV Vive and Oculus Rift.

Think of this virtual exercise as your chance to become Superman. You shift your weight in all different directions as you fly, drive, travel through water and even parachute. Players move their body to pass through hoops, progress through stages and generally explore virtual environments. It ultimately proves to be a fantastic workout, especially for the abdominal muscles, waistline and chest. In the end, you’ll feel the buzz of a thorough workout and also obtain plenty of enjoyment from exploring a virtual world. It probably won’t be long until Active VR arrives in gyms and fitness facilities throughout the world.

Vive Goes Wireless

TPCast unveiled a kit that transforms the Vive virtual reality headset into a wireless machine. Though his technology was announced before CES 2017, the show provided tech geeks with the first opportunity to try it out. CES participants raved about the technology’s smooth experience with absolutely no noticeable lag. Look for this wireless headset to ameliorate the VR fitness niche that requires extensive player movement. At the current moment, TPCast’s kit allows for wireless play upwards of 90 minutes in length. The battery life will only increase as the technology improves in the coming months and years.

Vive’s Tracker and Deluxe Audio Strap

The Vive tracker was also on display at CES 2017. This nifty little device will likely provide ample utility for all different types of virtual reality exercise software. The Vive Tracker closely follows player movements in real-time. It will be used on all sorts of sports-related equipment used for virtual reality gaming. It won’t be long until you see the Vive Tracker applied to tennis rackets, baseball bats, golf clubs, hockey sticks etc.

The Deluxe Audio Strap was also shown at this year’s CES. It provides integrated audio that significantly enhances the playing experience. Players can adjust these headphones in manner desired. The headphones can be customized for the perfect fit, regardless of the player’s idiosyncratic head size or shape.

 


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